William Shakespeare Quotes

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Crabbed age and youth cannot live together:Youth is full of pleasure, age is full of care

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I gyve unto my wief my second best bed with the furniture
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For there is an upstart Crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his Tygers hart wrapt in a Players hyde, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blanke verse as the best of you: and beeing an absolute Johannes fac totum, is in his owne conceit the onely Shake-scene in a countrey.

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This figure that thou here seest put,It was for gentle Shakespeare cut,Wherein the graver had a strifeWith Nature, to out-do the life:O could he but have drawn his witAs well in brass, as he has hitHis face; the print would then surpassAll that was ever writ in brass:But since he cannot, reader, lookNot on his picture, but his book.
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Let me not to the marriage of true mindsAdmit impediments.

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When great poets sing,Into the night new constellations spring,With music in the air that dulls the craftOf rhetoric. So when Shakespeare sang or laughedThe world with long, sweet Alpine echoes thrilledVoiceless to scholars' tongues no muse had filledWith melody divine.
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On this planet the reputation of Shakespeare is secure. When life is discovered elsewhere in the universe and some interplanetary traveler brings to this new world the fruits of our terrestrial culture, who can imagine anything but that among the first books carried to the curious strangers will be a Bible and the works of WIlliam Shakespeare.

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Now you who rhyme, and I who rhyme,Have not we sworn it, many a time,That we no more our verse would scrawl,For Shakespeare he had said it all!
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Shakespeare led a life of Allegory; his works are the comments on it.

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The occasionally expressed popular belief that Shakespeare must have helped prepare the translation of the Bible completed for King James in 1610 is based solely on the circumstances that a few famous passages from the translation and from Shakespeare's tragedies are the only specimens of Jacobian English most people ever hear. Jonson, and in 1970, selah , is spear .