Every human action gains in honor, in grace, in all true magnificence, by its regard to things that are to come. It is the far sight, the quiet and confident patience, that, above all other attributes, separate man from man, and near him to his Maker; and there is no action nor art, whose majesty we may not measure by this test.

-John Ruskin
John Ruskin

The very cheapness of literature is making even wise people forget that if a book is worth reading, it is worth buying. No book is worth anything which is not worth much; nor is it serviceable, until it has been read, and re-read, and loved, and loved again; and marked, so that you can refer to the passages you want in it.

John Ruskin
Mountains are the beginning and the end of all natural scenery. John Ru
John Ruskin

When a man is wrapped up in himself, he makes a pretty small package. John Ru

John Ruskin
Multitudes think they like to do evil; yet no man ever really enjoyed doing evil since God made the world.
John Ruskin

The essence of lying is in deception, not in words. John Ru

John Ruskin
He who has truth at his heart need never fear the want of persuasion on his tongue.
John Ruskin

A gentleman's first characteristic is that fineness of structure in the body which renders it capable of the most delicate sensation; and of structure in the mind which renders it capable of the most delicate sympathies; one may say simply "fineness of nature.

John Ruskin
And besides; the problem of land, at its worst, is a bye one; distribute the earth as you will, the principal question remains inexorable, Who is to dig it? Which of us, in brief word, is to do the hard and dirty work for the rest, and for what pay?
John Ruskin

Fine art is that in which the hand, the head, and the heart of man go together.

John Ruskin
It is, indeed, right that we should look for, and hasten, so far as in us lies, the coming of the day of God; but not that we should check any human effort by anticipations of its approach. We shall hasten it best by endeavoring to work out the tasks that are appointed for us here; and, therefore, reasoning as if the world were to continue under its existing dispensation, and the powers which have just been granted to us were to be continued through myriads of future ages.