for we are inquiring not in order to know what virtue is, but in order to become good, since otherwise our inquiry would have been of no use

-Aristotle
Aristotle

Character is made by many acts; it may be lost by a single one.

Aristotle
The poet, being an imitator like a painter or any other artist, must of necessity imitate one of three objects - things as they were or are, things as they are said or thought to be, or things as they ought to be. The vehicle of expression is language - either current terms or, it may be, rare words or metaphors.
Aristotle

Democracy arises out of the notion that those who are equal in any respect are equal in all respects; because men are equally free, they claim to be absolutely equal.

Aristotle
In order to be effective you need not only virtue but also mental strength.
Aristotle

And this lies in the nature of things: What people are potentially is revealed in actuality by what they produce.

Aristotle
The law is reason, free from passion.
Aristotle

If everything when it occupies an equal space is at rest, and if that which is in locomotion is always occupying such a space at any moment, the flying arrow is therefore motionless.

Aristotle
Men agree that justice in the abstract is proportion, but they differ in that some think that if they are equal in any respect they are equal absolutely, others that if they are unequal in any respect they should be unequal in all. The only stable principle of government is equality according to proportion, and for every man to enjoy his own.
Aristotle

The basis of a democratic state is liberty

Aristotle
Music directly imitates the passions or states of the soul...when one listens to music that imitates a certain passion, he becomes imbued withthe same passion; and if over a long time he habitually listens to music that rouses ignoble passions, his whole character will be shaped to an ignoble form.