It may be true that he travels farthest who travels alone, but the goal thus reached is not worth reaching.

-Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt

There is but one answer to terrorism and it is best delivered with a Winchester rifle.

Theodore Roosevelt
You can't choose your potential, but you can choose to fulfill it.
Theodore Roosevelt

Our flag is a proud flag, and it stands for liberty and civilization. Where it has once floated, there must be no return to tyranny.

Theodore Roosevelt
The function of our Government is to insure to all its citizens, now and hereafter, their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. If we of this generation destroy the resources from which our children would otherwise derive their livelihood, we reduce the capacity of our land to support a population, and so either degrade the standard of living or deprive the coming generations of their fight to life on this continent.
Theodore Roosevelt

Where a trust becomes a monopoly the state has an immediate right to interfere.

Theodore Roosevelt
Let us live in the harness, striving mightily.
Theodore Roosevelt

There should be relentless exposure of and attack upon every evil practice, whether in politics, in business, or in social life. I hail as a benefactor every writer or speaker, every man who, on the platform, or in book, magazine or newspaper, with merciless severity makes such attack, provided always that he in his turn remembers that the attack is of use only if it is absolutely truthful.

Theodore Roosevelt
It is better to be faithful than famous.
Theodore Roosevelt

In other words, character is far more important than intellect to the race as to the individual. We need intellect, and there is no reason why we should not have it together with character; but if we must choose between the two we choose character without a moment's hesitation.

Theodore Roosevelt
The plea of good intentions is not one that can be allowed to have much weight in passing historical judgment upon a man whose wrong-headedness and distorted way of looking at things produced, or helped to produce, such incalculable evil; there is a wide political applicability in the remark attributed to a famous Texan, to the effect that he might, in the end, pardon a man who shot him on purpose, but that he would surely never forgive one who did so accidentally.