No triumph of peace is quite so great as the supreme triumphs of war.

-Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt

Every thinking man, when he thinks, realizes that the teachings of the Bible are so interwoven and intertwined with our whole civic and social life that it would be literally, I do not mean figuratively, but literally impossible for us to figure what the loss would be if these teachings were removed. We would lose all the standards by which we now judge both public and private morals; all the standards toward which we, with more or less resolution, strive to raise ourselves.

Theodore Roosevelt
Get action. Seize the moment. Man was never intended to become an oyster. Theodore Roosevel
Theodore Roosevelt

It is an incalculable added pleasure to any one's sum of happiness if he or she grows to know, even slightly and imperfectly, how to read and enjoy the wonder-book of nature.

Theodore Roosevelt
No people ever yet benefited by riches if their prosperity corrupted their virtue.
Theodore Roosevelt

The United States does not have a choice as to whether or not is will or will not play a great part in the world. Fate has made that choice for us. The only question is whether we will play the part well or badly.

Theodore Roosevelt
A man's usefulness depends on his living up to his ideals insofar as he can. It is hard to fail but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. All daring and courage, all iron endurance of misfortune, make for a finer, nobler type of manhood. Only those are fit to live who do not fear to die; and none are fit to die who have shrunk from the joy of life and the duty of life.
Theodore Roosevelt

When you play, play hard; when you work, don't play at all.

Theodore Roosevelt
More and more, as it becomes necessary to preserve the game, let us hope that the camera will largely supplant the rifle.
Theodore Roosevelt

A typical vice of American politics the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues, and the announcement of radical policies with much sound and fury, and at the same time with a cautious accompaniment of weasel phrases each of which sucks the meat out of the preceding statement.

Theodore Roosevelt
The farmer is a poor creature who skins the land and leaves it worthless to his children. The farmer is a good farmer who, having enabled the land to support himself and to provide for the education of his children, leaves it to them a little better than he found it himself.